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The Most Common Traveler Manias

Maybe your love of travel is not a normal one, so let’s check. Believe it or not, travelers are prone to be affected by multiple manias and you might have some of these. For example, if your desire to travel is insatiable, you might be a dromomaniac. However, this is just the tip of the iceberg. Take a look to see if you have any of the other common manias shared by world-travelers.

Before anyone gets defensive about this, we want you to know that we mean no offense, however, we will point out the common issues some people have.

This is our list of the most common manias usually connected with dromomania.

Oniomania

An uncontrollable urge to shop. This is usually experienced after soaking in the first bunch of experiences from coming to a new place. So, once you have gone to the beach, checked out the local cuisine and maybe even danced a little, you might start feeling claustrophobic and bored if you do not go out to have a shopping spree.

Unfortunately, this does not go away fast enough. A single shopping trip will not do nearly enough for an Oniomaniac. Simply put, obsessive shopping will have adverse effects on your life if you do not know how to manage it.

Phagomania

Sometimes, people will believe that they are simply gourmets and that they just love to travel and taste new foods. Unfortunately, some people will suffer from a compulsive need to eat, which can sometimes be seriously detrimental as some people cannot stop themselves from dining out multiple times in the same evening.

There is a reason why this mania chooses to rear its ugly head during long trips and it is connected with hedonism in a way. Once you are already on a trip it is a lot easier to both justify spending a lot more money on food and to justify overeating as a way of enjoying life as your vacation is all about pleasing yourself.

Ecdemomania

The need to wander. It does sound pretty similar to the urge to travel, but there is a big difference. Dromomania is usually satisfied once you reach the place you set out to visit. However, those who have ecdemomania will not be capable to satisfy their need to wander. Once they reach their hotel thousands of miles away from home, they will get bored and feel the need to wander once more. Basically, they are the ADHD people of the travelers’ community. They do not stay with their groups and tend to get lost in their explorations.

Epomania

We all love posting on Facebook whenever we are taking a trip. However, if you cannot stop yourself from writing a 4,000-word blog post each day for all you’ve seen, you might be obsessed with writing. This is usually noticed only with the help of others who comment that they do not need to know every single thing that happened to you while you were on a trip.

Sophomania

Some people only like to travel so that they can maintain their feeling of superiority over others. And some of those people suffer from sophomania. A delusional opinion of their own intellectual superiority over others. Sophomaniacs will take great pride about figuring out how to operate old elevators, bathtub faucets or how to get groceries without knowing a single word of the native language.

Doromania

The uncontrollable need to buy gifts for others. This mania usually does not show itself until the end of the trip comes and then – panic! The feeling of guilt that comes with forgetting about presents for everybody you know and the follow up of running around through crowded streets trying to figure out which items would make perfect souvenirs for each of your friends. And, the guilt will make you spend a lot more money than you usually would.

Verbomania

Being obsessed with words. Those who suffer from it will not necessarily show a lot of interest to learn the language of the country that they are visiting, but they will try their hardest to figure out what certain words mean and how they can use them. However, if they fail in their attempt, they might choose to fixate on the words they already know and basically force them on unsuspecting workers trying to make their hosts understand them through repetition.

In the end, as you can see, a lot of these are rather manageable and, if you truly love travel, don’t allow yourself to overthink your motives as long as you can afford it.

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